Tag Archives: authors

New Building, New Books: A New School Year Dawns at Osgoode

The renovations to the Osgoode Hall Law School building were not quite finished in time for the start of the new school year, but close enough for us to move back in and reclaim it. After two years in temporary digs scattered about the York campus, it’s a joy for us all to be together again in one place. And what a place! The overwhelming impression for me is of light and space. Those of you familiar with the brutalist, bricked-in Osgoode of old will appreciate that this is an enormous and welcome change. I snapped a few photos (above) so that you can see for yourself.

Of course it wasn’t just the opportunity to photograph the new Osgoode against a blue sky backdrop that brought me up to school on a sunny Friday afternoon in what for me is a sabbatical year. It was the celebration of the publication of new books by two of my colleagues: Copyright, Communication and Culture: Towards a Relational Theory of Copyright Law by Carys Craig, and a second edition of Intellectual Property Law: Copyrights, Patents, Trade-marks by David Vaver. Both authors spoke eloquently about their books to whet our appetites for reading them.

Carys Craig riffed on the cover image of her book to convey something of its content. It’s a book that squarely takes aim at the dominant conception of copyright as private property. In it, she argues that this conception misrepresents authorship and the process of cultural creation in ways which, when translated into law, lead to the stifling rather than the stimulation of creativity and expression. She proposes instead a relational theory to underpin a copyright law that would better serve our social and cultural values. I haven’t done her presentation justice with that brief description. I tried to take careful notes but soon gave up as pretty much everything she said seemed worth writing down. Of course, this bodes very well for the book! Suffice it to say that it promises to be a most thought-provoking book and I’m very keen to read it.

David Vaver spoke a bit about what’s new in the second edition of his authoritative text. The attention paid to intellectual property by the Supreme Court of Canada in the fifteen years that have elapsed since the first edition was published necessitated significant expansion. But he devoted most of his speaking time to making a case for the importance and relevance of intellectual property law to other fields of law. He was preaching to the converted where I’m concerned (my advanced torts course covers all of the points of intersection between IP and torts that he mentioned), but the case he made was a convincing one by any measure. And he nicely tied the two themes of this post together for me with his opening gambit. We may think that we’re in a building right now, he said, but in fact we’re in a copyrightable architectural work. And what of the renovations? Might the modifications to the Osgoode building violate the moral rights of the original architect? An entertaining and enlightening afternoon all round.

Today’s book launch was just the first of many events to be held at Osgoode this year that are apt to be of interest to devotees of law and the arts. I will report on them here, and offer up a bit of advance notice as well for the benefit of those of you in the Toronto area who may wish to attend. We’d love to have you come visit us in our lovely, newly renovated building!