Tag Archives: bookstores

Kate Sutherland

Weekend Roundup of News & Reviews, February 14-20, 2011

Below are links to some of the news stories and book reviews related to law and the arts that caught my attention this week.

Ablene Cooper has filed a lawsuit against author Kathryn Stockett over her best-selling novel The Help. Cooper, who has spent much of life working as a maid, including twelve years in the employ of Stockett’s brother, claims that one of the characters in the book, a maid named Aibileen Clark, “is an unauthorized appropriation of her name and image, which she finds emotionally distressing.” The complaint details a number of similarities between the complainant and the character. Stockett’s publishers have indicated that they “don’t think there is any basis to the legal claims.” (NYT, Guardian)

The UK government has indicated that it may take control of libraries if local councils “are overzealous in closures,” out of concern that “some communities, particularly rural ones, may end up with no access to library services,” and worry over “the effects of the closures on children and the elderly.” (The Bookseller)

This week Borders, the second-largest bricks-and-mortar bookstore chain in the U.S., filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Publishers are particularly hard hit by this latest blow to the book industry, as much of Borders’ debt is owed to them. (Los Angeles Times)

Just a day later, Australians were shocked by the “collapse of REDgroup, which owns the country’s largest bookshop chain Angus & Robertson, as well as Borders and the Whitcoulls chain of newsagencies in New Zealand.” The Sydney Morning Herald reports that this occurrence is not linked to the fate of the U.S. namesake of Borders Australia, though the bricks-and-mortar book trade on both sides of the Pacific has similarly “suffered from the rise of internet book sales and constrained consumer spending.” The affected chains have been “placed into voluntary administration.” (The Bookseller, Sydney Morning Herald)

David LaChapelle has launched a copyright infringement suit against Rihanna, alleging that the recently released music video for her song “S & M” borrows heavily from the imagery of his photographs. (NYT, Radar Online, Daily Mail)

In another case allegedly involving the use of real names in fiction, a lawyer for CBS was in court in California this week seeking the dismissal of a defamation and invasion of privacy suit brought against the network over an episode of television crime drama CSI. Scott and Melinda Tamkin claim that the episode, featuring a couple named Scott and Melinda Tucker, was penned by the scriptwriter “using their names and likeness at a time when he was angry with them because of a real estate deal gone awry.” A three-justice panel of the 2nd District Court of Appeal will issue its decision within 90 days. (Daily News)

Jayme Gordon, a Boston illustrator, has filed a copyright infringement suit against Dreamworks Animation. He alleges that characters in the hit movie Kung Fu Panda “are substantially similar to illustrations of characters he created and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office in 2000 that are collectively titled Kung Fu Panda Power,” and that “DreamWorks rejected illustrations he sent to them in the 1990s.” (The Unruly of Law)

Irish artist Jim Fitzpatric is seeking to secure copyright to his iconic picture of Che Guevara. He explains that he hadn’t sought royalties earlier despite the proliferation of the image because he’s never cared about money. But now he wants to establish ownership “so he can hand over the rights to the Guevara family and the Cuban people” when the Che Guevara Cultural Centre opens in Havana in September. (The Irish Times)

In accordance with a ruling now made final by the U. S. Department of the Interior, the University of Pennsylvania must return sacred Tlingit artifacts, including “ceremonial hats and helmets” that “were purchased by a curator in the university’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1918 to 1925.” (Chronicle of Higher Education)

An exhibition at Rome’s State Archives reveals the truth behind the bad boy image of Renaissance painter Caravaggio. His crimes, detailed in carefully preserved “handwritten police logs, legal and court parchments” from the late 16th and early 17th centuries, ranged from assaulting a waiter with a plate of artichokes, to carrying a sword and a dagger without a permit, to killing a man over a gambling debt. (BBC)

For four decades, Camilo José Vergara has been photographing murals “in the poorest and most segregated communities in America.” Now he has assembled a slide show of some of these images to showcase the unique view of black history that they offer: “Official murals painted on schools, hospitals, government offices, and community organizations often portray a cheerful and optimistic view of racial progress, but murals on the walls of convenience and liquor stores, barbershops, fast food restaurants, churches, and abandoned buildings offer a lively alternative to this bland vision.” The photograph that heads this post was taken by Vergara in Compton, California in 2000. (Slate Magazine)

This week an exhibition of new work by artist James Hart Dyke opens in London. It includes 40 paintings, 25 drawings, and prints that document a year he spent shadowing MI6, the British Secret Intelligence Service. He was invited to do so by then head of the organization, John Scarlett, at the behest of MI6 officers who felt that the paintings he would produce would be a suitable way to document their history “as part of the run-up to the 2010 centenary year.” Praised by Scarlett as “highly evocative of life inside MI6,” Hart Dyke’s exhibition promises to be “an unexpected treat for that section of the British public who are endlessly fascinated by spies and their world.” (Guardian)

Thriller writer Charles Cumming is interviewed by Jake Kerridge about his new novel, The Trinity Six, “a yarn about an academic’s attempts to uncover the identity of a previously unsuspected sixth member of the Cambridge spy ring.” (Telegraph)

Thirteen lost short stories by Daphne Du Maurier, tracked down by Ann Willmore, a Cornish bookseller and longtime Du Maurier fan, are to be published by Virago Press in May. Says Willmore of the stories: “They have a sting in the tale, and are quite sinister. They are different from her novels.” My curiosity is thoroughly piqued. (The Independent)

According to Charles McGrath, Wesley Stace’s Charles Jessold, Considered as a Murderer is at once a murder mystery and a novel about classical music that features both “a convincing fictional composer” and “an entertaining fictional critic.” (NYT)

Brett Alexander Savory pronounces Keith Hollihan’s debut novel, The Four Stages of Cruelty, “powerful” and “mesmerizing.” Set in a maximum security prison, with a female corrections officer as the main character, Savoy tells us, it offers “startling moments of insight into what separates people from monsters⎯not much at all.” (Globe and Mail)

Hallie Ephron praises Kate Taylor’s historical novel A Man in Uniform for offering a fresh take on the Dreyfus affair. In it, lawyer François Dubon finds his orderly life in 1897 Paris turned upside down when he is persuaded to assist Captain Dreyfus after he has been convicted of spying for Germany. Along the way, Dubon “rediscovers the passion for justice that led him to practice law in the first place.” Ephron concludes: “It rewards the patient reader with a rich sense of time and place while offering a fascinating look at a historically based what-if.” (Boston Globe)

In Louise Dean’s “darkly comic” and “bracingly acerbic” novel The Old Romantic, Nick Goodyew, an English divorce lawyer, through the efforts of his put-upon younger brother, reunites with his parents from whom he is estranged, and who are estranged from each other. Sylvia Brownrigg writes of the novel: “Although class markers are a recurrent theme, The Old Romantic is essentially a highly entertaining, vivid evocation of love and marriage in its various forms.” (NYT)

In an omnibus review of new books about print magazines, Steven Heller finds much to like in a pair of books about the publications that provoked and emerged in the wake of the 1954 institution of the Comics Code in the United States. Heller says of The Horror! The Horror! Comic Books the Government Didn’t Want You to Read!: “In addition to offering a generous helping of controversial comics … Trombetta’s book provides insightful history.” And he sums up The Weird World Of Eerie Publications: Comic Gore That Warped Millions of Young Minds! as “a curiously wonderful, weird and eerie tale of magazine history.” (NYT)